ANN: Hiatus Break


First and foremost, I just want to say sorry for not posting for about a month now. It’s been awhile since I last updated my blog. I  usually visit a museum/art gallery at least once a week but for this last few weeks, I’ve failed. Here I am today to tell you my reasons for that hiatus break.

First, I had attended a lot of film festivals lately (and I still do) and it affected my schedules. I do love films. And this film festivals do make me happy. Also, the cinemas are near where I live, so it doesn’t became a problem.

Before I move forward for the second & last reason I have, I’ll let you know the purpose of this blog as a whole. For the last few months, I am mentally unstable. Yes, I am depressed and have anxiety disorder. This illness made me unproductive. So, as an escape, I decided to treat myself some ‘happiness’. I decided to wander around the city and lose & find myself at the same time. I decided to go to different museums & art galleries so I won’t suffer consistently on my depression. I did. I went to lots of museums & art galleries around Pasig, Pasay, Manila & more. I am actually not comfortable commuting alone because I’m not familiar with the roads/streets/places in general—I don’t go out a lot; but I did made it. I promise myself to do that consistently but things happened. 

Today, my depression consumes me a lot. I become more unproductive and such. I, personally, don’t wanna go outside, don’t wanna mingle to a lot of people no matter if they are my friends or acquaintances. I always find myself lying on the sofa or my bed at home—staying up all night for no particular reason. I feel so lonely. I feel so worthless. So, I’m sorry if I did let you all down.

I promise, once I finally had the courage and the urge to do this again, I’ll do all my best. I can’t promise a new update by this week or next, but I’ll do my best to make it sooner. I just wanted to let you all know that I am grateful to all of you. ☺

I didn’t chose to have my depression, it is a thing—please do understand. Thank you!

-Maro


 

Promdi (Various Artists)


About the exhibit:

The Promdi Project is a survey of contemporary art practices in Dumaguete and surrounding areas through the persona of the artist-teacher—a knowing analog of the protagonist of the promdi parable. Selections for the exhibition was based primarily on active contemporary visual arts practices whose tone and tenor draw from concurrent teaching practices, both informal and institution-based.

(words taken from the CCP exhibition brochure)

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Myth (Jippy Pascua | Dennese Victoria)


About the exhibit:

Although an exhibition of photographs, Myth is not so much about the individual images, as it is about how and why the two artists have accumulated, kept, and and eventually selected the images for this installations. Key themes are: memory, imperfection, mistakes, repetition and similarity, truth, real and imagined. These themes have been drawn from studying the relationship that images have with memory and with meaning, and also from looking at photography as a medium itself—questioning its capacity and capability including its inadequacies.

(words taken from the CCP exhibition brochure)

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Museo ng Kalinangang Pilipino (CCP Museum)


About the museum: 

The Museo ng Kalinangang Pilipino is an integrated humanities museum established in 1988. It gathers together the works of Filipino traditional artists and preserves Filipino artistic traditions; studies and interprets these to provide a deeper understanding of Filipino national culture evolving with and for the people; and strengthens the people’s awareness of the integral, dynamic role of creativity and artistic expression in national life and culture.

A permanent exhibit entitled “Diwa: Buhay, Ritwal at Sining” showcases significant Filipino artistic traditions and explores the development of Philippine art and aesthetics in the socio-cultural context. Another important permanent exhibit is the CCP Collection of Traditional Asian Musical Instruments from the Philippines, Japan, Indonesia, India, Thailand, China and Korea.

(words from culturalcenter.gov.ph)

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Galleria Duemila


About the museum:

Galleria Duemila was established in 1975 by Italian-born Silvana Ancellotti-Diaz. Today it is the longest running commercial gallery in the Philippines and maintains a strong international profile. With the vision to expose Filipino artists locally and within the ASEAN region, Galleria Duemila specializes in contemporary paintings, sculptures, works on paper and installations, as well as rare secondary-market stock by modern Filipino masters. It handles rare works by modern masters of the early 20th century, including Fernando Amorsolo, Fernando Zobel, H.R. Ocampo, Vicente Manansala, Jose Joya and Cesar Legaspi and showcases local and foreign artists from the current generation. This mix of established and emerging artists presents a dynamic program of monthly art exhibitions complimented by performances, readings and musical events in its custom-built gallery in Pasay City, Manila.

 Apart from these endeavors, Galleria Duemila significantly devotes much of its resources in the advocacy of art historical research and scholarship with the publication of the books “Yuta: Earthworks by Julie Lluch”, “Diosdado Magno Lorenzo: Art Rebel to Legend” and Messenger of the Gods: A Duddley Diaz Retrospective (Tentative Title) among others. Galleria Duemila also takes pride for being the only local gallery to do in depth research in order to mount Artists’ Retrospective Exhibitions namely that of “Julie Lluch’s” at the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) in 2008 and that of “Duddley Diaz’” at the Jorge B. Vargas Museum (UPVM) in 2009. Equally important projects include artist Pacita Abad’s “Circles in my Mind” Exhibition in 2004 at the CCP and a collaborative work with the National Commission for Culture and the Arts and the UST Museum for the documentation and exhibition of “L’orto dei Marni: Francesco Riccardo Monti Scultore 1888-1958” in 2005.

 Working closely with the foremost private and corporate collectors of Philippine art here and abroad, the gallery also maintains close ties with museums throughout Asia, Australia, Europe and the United States. It has sold artworks to museums such as the Singapore Art Museum and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts in Manila and has engaged in collaborative work with the Metropolitan Museum. Corporate collectors acquiring art from the gallery include ABS-CBN, Bank of Tokyo, Bank of Philippine Islands and San Miguel Properties. Works of art have also been placed in a number of internationally recognized hotels, such as the Pacific Star Hotel in Guam, The Manila Hotel, The Hotel Intercontinental, and the Shangrila Hotels in Makati and Davao City to name a few.

(words from www.galleriaduemila.com)

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Philippine National Police Museum (PNP Museum)

About the museum:

The PNP Museum is a two-story edifice where visitors can learn about the past and present of the people responsible for enforcing the law and maintaining peace and order.  On display are interesting  artifacts and memorabilia from the time the PNP was known as the Philippine Constabulary until it became a national police force.

There is also a gallery on the second floor featuring police officers who received the Medalya ng Kagitingan or Medal of Valor, the highest honor that can be conferred by a nation to its law enforcers. A velvet rope separates the gallery from the rest of the items on exhibit at that floor to emphasize its importance. Interestingly, some of those featured in the gallery are still alive today.

(words from raintravels.blogspot.com) —he also did a blog about this museum so check it out!

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Armed Forces of the Philippines Museum (AFP Museum)


About the musem:

The Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) Museum is a museum dedicated to the preservation , perpetuation, conservation and promotion of the Philippines’ remarkable military traditions, culture and history. It displays various episodes of the Army’s evolution, pictures of revolutionary heroes, medal for the AFP, and weapons of the army.

Located at General Arturo Enrile Building, Camp Aguinaldo in Quezon City, the museum was completed in 1995. The outdoor display consists of various equipment used by the different branches of the AFP. The indoor exhibit, on the other hand, is full of displays and paintings from founding of the revolutionary forces that took up arms against the Spanish up to the present day.

The museum’s special feature is a tunnel with several arteries leading to different exits. There is also a special exhibit sponsored by the Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor.

Other prized collections of the exhibit are the rayadillo uniform that was worn in battle by General Emilio Aguinaldo; authenticated, handwritten letters of Apolinario Mabini; and dioramas of vintage weaponry and other military hardware, field uniforms, documents and photographs that retrace the evolution of Philippine soldiery since pre-colonial times. Dioramas also feature the military?s decades-old campaign against communist insurgents and Moro separatists.

(words by en.wikipilipinas.org)

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Lopez Memorial Museum (and Library)


About the museum:

The Lopez Memorial Museum is the oldest privately owned and managed museum and library specializing in Philippine material. Its rariori reach back to books and maps of the sixteenth century, works by the first internationally acclaimed duo of Filipino painters, Juan N. Luna (1857-1899) and Felix P. Resurreccion Hidalgo (1855-1913), plus priceless personal effects of Philippine National Hero José Rizal (1861-1896). With over 500 works in its growing museum collection and over 20,000 titles in its expanding library catalogue, the museum cares for holdings covering 600 years of scholarship and artistry.

After its inauguration in 1960, the museum established the Eugenio Lopez Foundation to ensure its future; institutionalized a curatorial management system and committed team; strengthened its conservation facilities; and increased audience development services. The Lopez Memorial Museum cultivates a legacy of exemplary quality, timeless relevance, persistent awakening of wisdom and knowledge, dynamic reaching out to multiplying users, and purposeful accessibility to the richness and dynamism of Philippine culture.

(words from lopez-museum.com)

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Museum of the Filipino People (National Museum of the Philippines)


The museum houses three buildings in Manila; The Museum of the Filipino People, The National Art Gallery and the National Planetarium. To keep it simple & organized, I decided to post a blog for each divisions. 


About the museum:

The building was originally designed as the public library by Ralph Harrington Doane, the American consulting architect of the Bureau of Public Works, and his assistant Antonio Toledo. Construction began in 1918 but was suspended several times because of lack of funds. When it was decided that the building should be used by the Legislature, the revisions of the plans was entrusted to Juan Arellano, then supervising architect of the Bureau. The building was inaugurated on 16 July 1926, and by then had cost four million pesos.

The building was part of Daniel Burnham’s plan for the development of Manila. Upon its completion, the second, third, and fourth floors were occupied by the Senate and House of Representatives while the ground floor was occupied by the National Library.

The 1934 Constitutional Convention was held in this building. On its front steps Manuel L. Quezon was sworn in as President of the Commonwealth. The Legislative Building was a casualty during the bombing and shelling of Manila in 1945. It was reconstructed in 1946 following the original plans but with some revisions, such as the replacement of flat pilasters of the stately rounded engaged columns.

In mid-1996, the Senate of the Philippines moved out of the building. In 2003, renovation started to transform it into the National Art Gallery of the National Museum.

(words from www.nationalmuseum.gov.ph)

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National Art Gallery (National Museum of the Philippines)


The museum houses three buildings in Manila; The Museum of the Filipino People, The National Art Gallery and the National Planetarium. To keep it simple & organized, I decided to post a blog for each divisions.


About the museum:

The building was originally designed as the public library by Ralph Harrington Doane, the American consulting architect of the Bureau of Public Works, and his assistant Antonio Toledo. Construction began in 1918 but was suspended several times because of lack of funds. When it was decided that the building should be used by the Legislature, the revisions of the plans was entrusted to Juan Arellano, then supervising architect of the Bureau. The building was inaugurated on 16 July 1926, and by then had cost four million pesos.

The building was part of Daniel Burnham’s plan for the development of Manila. Upon its completion, the second, third, and fourth floors were occupied by the Senate and House of Representatives while the ground floor was occupied by the National Library.

The 1934 Constitutional Convention was held in this building. On its front steps Manuel L. Quezon was sworn in as President of the Commonwealth. The Legislative Building was a casualty during the bombing and shelling of Manila in 1945. It was reconstructed in 1946 following the original plans but with some revisions, such as the replacement of flat pilasters of the stately rounded engaged columns. In mid-1996, the Senate of the Philippines moved out of the building. In 2003, renovation started to transform it into National Art Gallery of the national Museum.

(words from www.nationalmuseum.gov.ph)
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